Tag Archive for Massachusetts NonProfit CPA Firm

Watch our Webinar: Methods to Effectively Manage Your Non-Profit’s Tax Risk

Get Best Practices and Insights on Top Issues!

As a non-profit organization, you face different types of risks than for-profit companies. Board members and financial executives are often surprised at the extent of the tax exposures actually faced by tax-exempt organizations.

Non-profit organizations are open to many tax and reputational risks, as Form 990 tax filing is open for the world to see. Tax matters that may affect your organization include unrelated business activities, intermediate sanctions, donor and fundraising issues. Other topics such as fringe benefits, nonqualified deferred compensation arrangements, and joint ventures take on new significance from the perspective of your non-profit organization’s tax function.

To make matters even more challenging, the IRS has also announced it is increasing the use of data queries of tax filings for selection of tax-exempt organizations for examination.

Watch our webinar to learn more about:

  • The top 10 U.S. Federal issues facing non-profit organizations
  • Our predictions for IRS audit selection queries
  • Best practices for your tax risk function
  • Identifying red flags and minimizing tax/reputational risks with a diagnostic check-up

Who Should Watch: Board Members, Executive Management, Chief Financial Officers, Finance Department Members

Download the Webinar Now!

Navigating The Crowded Non-Profit Sector

Nonprofit donors

How organizations can set themselves apart to secure—and retain—donors

By Shannon Crowley, CPA, MSA
Accounting Manager

Despite the Great Recession and the long process of economic recovery of the 2000s, the non-profit sector has become one of the country’s fastest-growing industries. According to the National Center for Charitable Statistics’ most recent research, the United States is home to more than 1.5 million registered non-profit organizations—marking a nearly 20 percent increase over the last 10 years, a time frame in which many businesses in the for-profit sector have struggled.

This rapid growth is certainly a sign of success, and—as non-profits employ nearly 11 million American workers and contribute roughly $887 billion to the national economy—it is difficult for anyone to argue against the economic value of a thriving non-profit sector.

However, the unprecedented rate at which new organizations are being created is also creating a challenge. The non-profit sector is more crowded than ever before, making it very difficult for organizations to secure—and retain—their donor bases.

On a local level, there are 33,000 non-profit organizations registered in Massachusetts—each competing with one another for precious dollars from a limited pool of individual donors, corporate foundations and other fundraising sources. In a recent cover story in The Boston Globe, many industry experts argue the field of non-profit organizations in Massachusetts is simply too large to sustain.

However, the organizations themselves, and the tens of thousands of Massachusetts residents employed by non-profits, are doing everything they can to prove those experts are wrong.

And that starts with donor retention.

The Association of Fundraising Professionals reports that, on average, donor retention rates across the non-profit sector are around 43%, meaning less than half of an organization’s 2016 donor base will contribute. In order to grow in a competitive non-profit environment, organizations have to find a way to land recurring donors. To do this, non-profits are employing several strategies. For the purposes of this article, we’ll focus on three:

Differentiating themselves from other, potentially similar organizations

Many potential donors or grant-awarding foundations would love to support every deserving cause that asks for and needs their help. Realistically, though, donors need to choose between hundreds, if not thousands, of similarly operating organizations to which they can lend their financial support. Non-profits, especially non-profits working to support similar demographics, are under enormous pressure to set themselves apart to attract new sources of funding. It’s never been more important for a non-profit to have a very clear, very specific mission.

Investing in “fundraising infrastructure”

Fundraising success is entirely beholden to the amount of time and resources organizations are willing to invest. In order to succeed in today’s hyper-competitive non-profit sector, organizations must invest in fundraising professionals, such as high-ranking development officers, and fundraising “infrastructure,” such as top-notch technology and donor databases.

The clear, specific vision makes an organization attractive to donors. Development professionals and in-depth donor databases help organizations find them.

Increase efficiency by streamlining their accounting functions

Back-office financial work is crucial to the long-term success of the organization. That said, it’s also very time-consuming. As many organizations are investing significantly more time to their fundraising operations, some non-profit leaders are finding ways to take complex financial paperwork off their desk so they can focus on the organization’s core competencies. This may entail creating new jobs for a full-time accounting team, or hiring a third-party financial organization to take on those responsibilities.

How BlumShapiro Can Help

BlumShapiro offers the accounting, tax and business consulting expertise non-profits need today. We are one of the largest non-profit accounting service providers in New England, our blend of accounting expertise and knowledge of non-profit organizations means we can offer you tremendous added value. We can assist you in complying with state and federal grant requirements, charitable giving rules, capital campaigns, endowment fund responsibilities and other specialized needs. Learn more >>

View Shannon’s Bio Here >>

Top 7 Responsibilities of Non-Profit Boards

iStock_000012107875_MediumNon-profit organizations in today’s business climate are expected to meet increasingly large demands while operating with small staffs and limited resources. In order to ensure sustainable success, non-profits must have in place effective, focused and committed leadership.

That starts with the organization’s Board of Directors.

Board Responsibilities:

Boards of directors (or boards of trustees) hold a great deal of responsibility in advancing non-profit organizations’ missions and leading the organizations toward successful futures. Some responsibilities of a non-profit board include:

  1. Strategic planning: The board should always be thinking about the “big picture.” From determining the organization’s mission and purpose to enhancing the organization’s public image, the board is responsible for the overall health of the non-profit.
  1. Selecting executive staff: Who will be the public face of the organization? That is one of the first and most important questions a non-profit board must answer. While the board operates behind the scenes to steer the organization in the right direction, the executive staff manages the day-to-day operations.
  1. Overseeing (and evaluating) executive leadership: The board should support the organization’s executive staff, making sure they have the resources and moral support they need to effectively do their jobs. Every organization hopes to avoid overturn, but – should the board deem it necessary – it does have the authority to remove executive leaders and team members.
  1. Budget approval: Serving as the non-profit’s governing body, the board is responsible for securing and strategically allocating financial resources in order to advance the organization’s mission. This is typically done through the approval of the annual budget.
  1. Setting compensation: While the board is not usually involved in setting individual staff salaries, they usually do this through the overall budget process.
  1. Fundraising: Non-profits’ annual budgets typically rely heavily on fundraising efforts. As the board is in charge of approving the organization’s budget, is is also responsible for ensuring the organization has the money it needs to fulfill its mission.
  1. Recruiting new members to the board: Membership on non-profit boards is typically very fluid. Board members step down for a variety of reasons, and new members are brought in to replace them. To ensure long-term success, an effective board will articulate clear prerequisites for members and offer training and guidance to new members.

Serving on a non-profit board can be a tremendously rewarding and enriching opportunity for any professional. But, as you can see, it also comes with a great deal of responsibility.

 

Hatch-Michelle-150x150

Michelle Hatch is a partner in our Non-Profit Services Group. She oversees audit and accounting engagements for non-profit organizations, including independent schools, trade associations, health and human service organizations and art, cultural and membership organizations. Michelle is also a member of the Employee Benefit Assurance Group and oversees audits for 401(k), 403(b) and defined benefit retirement plans.

 

The firm, with over 400 professionals and staff, offers a diversity of services, which includes auditing, accounting, tax and business advisory services. In addition, BlumShapiro provides a variety of specialized consulting services, such as succession and estate planning, business technology services, employee benefit plan audits, litigation support and valuation.  The firm serves a wide range of privately held companies, government and non-profit organizations and provides non-audit services for publicly traded companies.

Disclaimer: Any written tax content, comments, or advice contained in this article is limited to the matters specifically set forth herein. Such content, comments, or advice may be based on tax statues, regulations, and administrative and judicial interpretations thereof and we have no obligation to update any content, comments or advice for retroactive or prospective changes to such authorities. This communication is not intended to address the potential application of penalties and interest, for which the taxpayer is responsible, that may be imposed for non-compliance with tax law.

IRS Audits on the Rise for Tax Exempt Organizations

shutterstock_228440362Whether you are a board member, executive director, accounting manager or CFO of a non-profit organization, you should be aware that the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) is increasing their audits of the Form 990.

Effective for tax years beginning in 2008, the IRS extensively revised Federal Form 990to include a new summary page, a new governance section, enhanced reporting of executive compensation and an organization’s relationships with insiders and other organizations and new reporting for non-cash contributions, foreign activities, tax-exempt bonds and hospitals.

Now that several years have passed since the 990 revisions, the IRS has commenced auditing Form 990s based on “data-driven” criterion. This means organizations will be automatically selected for audit if certain data is detected by this automated process. The shift to “data-driven” assessments of an organization’s compliance with the federal tax laws, means that Form 990 preparation is more critical than ever. A properly prepared and executed information return will ensure that an organization’s chances for random audit selection are minimized and that exposure to income taxes, both on unrelated business income tax as well as other income by virtue of loss of exempt status, are kept at the lowest level possible.

Continue reading the article here >>

What have you done for your employee handbook lately?

In November 2014, Massachusetts citizens voted to entitle Massachusetts workers to earn and use paid sick time. In April 2015, the Attorney General released proposed regulations in order to help businesses comply with the new law. All employers are impacted by the law; however, only employers with 11 or more employees (not full-time equivalents (FTE’s)) during the calendar year are required to provide paid sick time to any employee whose primary workplace is located in Massachusetts, including part-time, full-time, seasonal or temporary employees. The new law takes effect on July 1, 2015.

According to a summary and the draft regulations published by the Attorney General’s office, some of the highlights of the new law are as follows:

• Massachusetts workers whose employers have 11 or more employees for at least 20 weeks during either the current or preceding calendar year (whether consecutive or not) can earn and use up to 40 hours of paid sick time per calendar year

• For employers with less than 11 employees for at least 16 weeks during either the current or preceding calendar year, workers can earn and use unpaid sick time

• The use of earned sick time can be used for:

o Caring for a physical or mental illness, injury or medical condition affecting the employee, spouse, child, parent or parent of a spouse

o Attending routine medical appointments for the employee, spouse, child, parent or parent of spouse

o Addressing the effects of domestic violence on the employee or employee’s dependent child

• Employees will earn at least one hour of sick time for every 30 hours worked

• Hours will begin to accrue on the date of hire, or July 1, 2015 (whichever is later) and employees can begin to use the sick time 90 days after that date (July 1, 2015 or date of hire, whichever is later).

• Up to 40 hours of earned sick time can be carried over to the next calendar year, but the employer is not required to provide more than 40 hours of paid sick time in one calendar year

• Earned sick time is not required to be paid out upon termination from employment

• Employers cannot require workers to make up the used sick time

• Other provisions exist within the law regarding requirements to provide notice, certification, documentation, retaliation, confidentiality, breaks in service, exempt employees and other responsibilities on the part of the employer and employee.

The above highlights are just a sample of what is in the draft regulations. All employers should be reviewing their employee handbooks containing human resource and PTO policies to ensure that their policies are up-to-date and compliant with the new law. An experienced employment attorney is recommended to ensure that circumstances specific to each organization are considered when reviewing for compliance.

Jeanne Pagnozzi Boston AccountantJeanne Pagnozzi is a manager in BlumShapiro’s Accounting and Auditing Department, based in Quincy, Massachusetts, Jeanne oversees attest and tax engagements and is responsible for engagement planning, staff supervision and coordination with client personnel to ensure successful completion of projects.