Tag Archive for Predictive Analytics

Applied Machine Learning: Optimizing Patient Care in Hospitals, Profitably

Why are so many industries exploring Machine Learning as a means of delivering innovation and value?  In my view, the technology speaks to a primitive urge – machine learning is like having a crystal ball, telling you what will happen next.  For a business, it can convey information about a customer before they introduce themselves.  On a personal level, when I consider what I would like to have information about in advance, the first thing that springs to mind is obvious: my health.  Am I about to get sick?  How can I improve my wellness and overall health?  If you are wearing a Fit-Bit right now, then you probably agree with me.

In my last blog, I shared some real-world examples for how the Hospitality Industry applies Machine Learning.  What about Health Care and Hospitals?  While hospitals have similar challenges, in that they accommodate guests who stay overnight, the objectives in health care are quite different, and changing rapidly.   The Affordable Care Act is driving new business models, incentivizing outcome based reimbursement as opposed to volume based reimbursement.  Unlike hotels, today’s hospitals are interested in ensuring their guests do not have to return, at least not in the short term.   They also need to manage costs in a way they have not been incentivized to do in the past.  Hospitals across the country are considering how predictive analytics can have a  meaningful impact on operations, leading to improved patient health and improving the bottom line.

The cost savings opportunity for health care providers is startling. Here are just three examples:

Reducing Hospital Readmissions – in 2014, Medicare fined 2,610 hospitals $428 million for having high hospital readmission rates. Leaving actual fines aside, industry analysts estimate that the overall cost of preventable readmissions approaches $25 Billion annually. As a result, hospital systems all over the nation are mobilizing to intervene, using ML to identify risk factors which are highly predictive of readmission. Carolinas Healthcare System, partnering with Microsoft, did just that. Using data from 200,000 patient-discharge records, they created a predictive model deliver customized discharge planning, saving the hospital system hundreds of thousands of dollars annually. Read the article in Healthcare IT News.

Clinical Variation Management – Mercy Hospital is partnering with Ayasdi to find the optimal care path for common surgical procedures. Using knee replacement as an example, the Clinical Variation Management software helps hospital administrators find clusters of patient outcomes, then enables the exploration of those clusters in order to correlate a metric (i.e. Length of Stay) with a certain regiment or activity. Watch this video to learn how Mercy Hospital saved $50 million by applying Machine Learning to an extremely common procedure.

Improving Population Health – Dartmouth Hitchcock, a healthcare network affiliated with Dartmouth University, is piloting a remote monitoring system for patients requiring chronic care. 6,000+ patients are permitting the hospital to collect biometric data (i.e. blood pressure, temperature, etc.) in order that nurses and health coaches can monitor their vital signs, and machines can predict good days and bad days. Quite the opposite of hospitality: Dartmouth Hitchcock is trying to keep the guests from needing to checking in! Read more about the Case Study from Microsoft.

Are machines taking over for physicians? No. The Patient – Physician relationship remains (and I think will always remain) central to the delivery of personal health care. However, it seems clear that ACA is providing significant rewards to health care providers who manage population risk better. Machines can help here: through data, machine learning can find risk “hiding in the data”.

Contact Blum Shapiro Consulting to learn more about how Azure Machine Learning can curtail hospital readmissions, identify variations in common clinical procedures and improve patient population health.

3 Tips to Jump Start your Data Science Plan

Are you looking to form a Data Science capability at your company?

If you answered, yes, then you probably already get the Machine Learning concept (The 4 Machine Learning Problems).  Maybe you are coming from either a Statistics or Computer Science background.  Either way, you see the potential of Data Science and Predictive Analytics and you’re ready to demonstrate some tangible benefit to management.

How are you getting started?  I’m hearing about two core hurdles:

  1. We’re looking for a great business problem to solve, one which could reasonably be solved with data the business already collects
  2. Our internal resources have very little practical experience working on a formal data science team, and don’t understand how it aligns to more traditional project teams

Time to Value is critical, but you need to do it in a way that has a formal process for managing risk, one which can be communicated inside and outside the team.  Here are the things you want to have in place, in order to launch your first project.

Establish Your Data Science Methodology – every project has a project plan and data science projects are no different.  What should the Data Science one look like?  Several teams of very smart people have already asked this question and independently arrived at the same conclusion.  My favorite is the “Cross Industry Standard Process for Data Mining”  (CRISP-DM) because it calls out the need for basic Business Understanding of the problem first.  Basically there are 6 phases of the process

  1. Set the Business Objectives
  2. Find the Data
  3. Prep and Cleanse the Data
  4. Do the Machine Learning Work
  5. Evaluate the Model You Created – does it meet the Business Objectives?
  6. Deploy the Model

Need a picture?  Note the backwards arrows – Data Science is an iterative process.

Assess your Data Capabilities – Data Science needs Data.  Teams that try to predict outcomes without relevant data are setup for failure.  An example: let’s say that you would like to forecast demand for your products, in order to reduce your inventory.  You might start with basic sales data and find that you are not getting the  level of prediction accuracy you expected.  What other factors might be driving demand?  Customer Satisfaction might be one you decide to include.  But what if your company is not measuring customer satisfaction in any quantifiable way?  Data Science leaders need to understand the capabilities of their company (in effect, the Data Science customer) with respect to data assets, in order to effectively determine which business problems are ripe for prediction.

Outsource the Team – Data Science requires a very specialized set of skills.  You probably have some of those skills yourself: Computer Science, Statistics and an understanding of the principles behind Machine Learning.  These three are important, but equally important is Business and Domain Knowledge.  Do you have a team of resources which possess all four?  If you are working with a technology provider who already understands your business and who also has demonstrated capability in  delivering data science value – then outsourcing the work to that team becomes very attractive.  If you don’t have such a resource, consider a business and technology consulting partner such as Blum Shapiro Consulting.  Provided you already understand the CRISP-DM process, you’ll be able to effectively manage a seasoned team of business and data science pros.

Can Data Science increase your bottom line?  Improve Customer Loyalty?  Drive down costs?  Yes it can, provided you have a methodology to manage the work as a project, data to support it and a capable team.  If you’re convinced the opportunity is there, follow these tips and Data Science will have a strategic role within your company after your first big win!

 

 

The 4 Machine Learning Problems, Explained

Machine Learning and Predictive Analytics have been receiving a lot of attention lately!  Without question, this is an exciting technology with extremely broad applicability.  After all, who wouldn’t want to be able to predict the future?  Still, with hype comes confusion, and there is a lot of confusion today about what exactly Machine Learning is and how to use it.

I have good news!  There are really only 4 (yes, four) Machine Learning problems.  For anyone who wants to explore the value of Machine Learning, it’s important to understand them, because the first step in any Machine Learning process is to figure out which of these problems you are trying to solve.  Data Science teams address this question before they begin designing a Machine Learning model.  If your problem does not fit into one of these buckets, forget the hype! You’re better off taking a simpler approach.

Classification – in this machine learning problem, we’re trying  to figure out if some bit of data (an observation) represents something simple which we already understand (a Label).  This label can either be a Yes or No decision, (Two Class) or it can be one of a set of possible answers (Multi Class).  In order for this to work well, you need to provide the Machine Learning model with examples first.  Applications include:

  1. Facial Recognition – is this picture an image of my customer?
  2. Voice Recognition – what word is represented by this sound?
  3. Handwriting Recognition – which letter in the alphabet does this image represent?
  4. Fraud Detection – is this transaction fraudulent?
  5. Medical Outcomes – will this person have a stroke in the next year?
  6. Proactive Maintenance – will this piece of machinery fail in the next 72 hours?
  7. Credit Default Risk – will this borrower default on his/her loan?

Regression – in this machine learning problem, a Yes or No answer is not going to be enough.  In order to solve this problem, the machine needs to predict a value (i.e. a price, a temperature, a measurement) by understanding the numeric relationship of that value to other values (or Factors).  If you took Calculus, this might sound like a simple “Rate of Change” function: you’re on the right track.  Just as with Classification, Regression problems need some examples in order to work well.  Applications include:

  1. Cost Analysis – when will be the best time to buy something?
  2. Demand Prediction – how many widget’s will we sell next year?

Clustering – this is where things get complicated (!!)  With the first two problems, we have examples we can use to “train” our machines to predict a label AND we can test them with labeled observations (known to Data Scientists as “Ground Truth”).  But what if we don’t have a ground truth?  The best we can do is identify clusters of observations.   Fair warning: without ground truth, evaluating the results will be a challenge.  Still, some applications include:

  1. Grouping of Content – Grouping Today’s News into Categories, or Documents into Topics
  2. Materials Classification – take a Raw Materials Master File and organize it into a taxonomy
  3. Customer Segmentation – identify similar customers based upon purchase behavior

Recommender – have you ever been on a website which presented a recommendation of something you might “Like”?  Movie recommendations on Netflix, product recommendations on Amazon, or advertisements on your apps – if you are familiar with the internet, you probably understand the premise here.

That’s it.  Now you know how to recognize a problem which Machine Learning can help you with.   If your business problem does not fall into one of these four, you don’t need a machine learning model to solve it.  More importantly, if you know the factors which drive a business outcome, just build a model in Excel – you don’t need a Data Science team for that.

Good luck!