Archive for Business Intelligence

5 Critical Skillsets for HR Analytics

Increasingly, companies are applying analytics and data science procedures to new areas of their business. Human Resources (HR) management, with its central role in managing the People in a business, is one such area. HR Analytics is a fact-based approach to managing people. A fact-based approach helps organizations validate their assumptions about how best to manage their people. This makes good business sense: on average, companies spend 70% of their budget on personnel expenses.

Using data and statistical methods, HR may look to examine people-oriented questions, such as:

  • Can we better understand employee absenteeism rates at a labor-intensive business, such as retail, food service or industrial manufacturing? Can we predict it?
  • Do our compensation realities reflect fair and balanced job classification policies? Asked differently, which factors are most predictive of compensation: ones we want to reward (i.e. education level, on-the-job performance) or ones we need to ignore (i.e. gender, age or race)?
  • What is our real employee churn rate? Can we identify employees headed out the door and take preventive steps?
  • Are our service response times keeping pace with spikes in customer demand?

These questions, and many more, can be answered with datasets, data science and statistics.  But how?  Analytics involves skill sets that go beyond those considered “traditional.” Knowledge of recruitment, hiring, firing and compensation are key to understanding HR processes. However, HR professionals often struggle to answer these questions in a data-driven manner, because they lack the diverse skills required to perform advanced analytics. These skills include statistical and data analytical techniques, data aggregation, and mathematical modelling. Finding the right data can be another challenge. Data analytics requires data, and that data is likely to reside in several different systems. IT professionals play a critical role. Finally, communication to the business is a key skill. HR Analytics projects may produce analysis and models that contradict conventional wisdom.  Action on these insights requires the team to communicate the what, why and how’s of Data Science.

To be successful, HR Analytics projects require five distinct skillsets to be successful in creating value for an organization.

  • Without Business input, HR Analytics projects may answer questions with no value added to the organization.
  • Without Marketing input, insights from HR Analytics will fail to be adopted by the business.
  • Without HR input, the team will struggle to recognize relevant data and interpret the outcomes.
  • Without Data Analytics input, analysis will be “stuck in first gear” – producing basic descriptive statistics (i.e. Averages and Totals), but never advancing to diagnostic (i.e. root cause) or predictive (i.e. Machine Learning) models.
  • Without IT input, the team struggles to acquire relevant data in a usable format.

HR leaders must engage all the required perspectives and skillsets to be successful with analytics. Business, marketing, HR and IT are common perspectives found in most organizations. But Data Analytics professionals, able to cleanse data, identify candidate predictive models and evaluate model output, are typically lacking.  We encourage HR professionals, interested in learning more about The Power of Data, to reach out to our Data Analytics Advisory Services team. Our goal is to help you understand the data science process, identify business opportunities, and potentially offer analytics services that fill in the missing pieces for your puzzle.

Want to learn more about the world of HR Analytics?  We are speaking at this year’s CBIA Human Resources Conference on the topic. We hope to see you there!

Berry_Brian-240About Brian: Brian Berry leads the Microsoft Business Intelligence and Data Analytics practice at BlumShapiro. He has over 15 years of experience with information technology (IT), software design and consulting. Brian specializes in identifying business intelligence (BI) and data management solutions for upper mid-market manufacturing, distribution and retail firms in New England. He focuses on technologies which drive value in analytics: data integration, self-service BI, cloud computing and predictive analytics

See the Impact Digital Transformation Can Have on Your Bottom Line

Digital Transformation has become an industry buzzword. We’re here to clarify what it means in dollars and cents.

Digital transformation represents an organizational change where data becomes relevant and valuable. Once transformed, these organizations use data to improve decision making, connect with their customers, improve vendor relationships and allow employees to provide higher level skills and value to the organization.

Digitally transformed organizations think about their products and services in both a physical and digital space, use technology to improve customer service, often have an enhanced perspective of their market and how their business model operates within that redefined market.

We believe that digital transformation is a qualification to compete in today’s business environment.

The question people often ask next is – how much does this cost?  We posit the answer to that question is nothing.  The cost (and risk) is in remaining stagnant. Digital transformation uncovers assets previously underutilized by the organization. The proper investments in digital transformation will only empower your organization to survive and thrive – and when done properly it should yield an immediate and direct ROI that returns value back to the organization straightaway.

We’ve developed a Digital Transformation Accounting Worksheet ROI calculator for you to experiment with. Punch in your numbers and let us know what you think.  We would be happy to discuss your digital transformation in more detail.

About Noah:

240-Ullman,-NoahNoah is the Director of Business Development for BlumShapiro’s Technology Consulting Group. He brings over 25 years of business experience from entrepreneurial start ups, to over a decade of working at Microsoft in various sales, marketing and business development roles. Noah has launched Windows XP, Office XP, Tablet PC, Media Center PC, MSN Direct Smartwatches (an early IoTattempt), several videogames, a glove controller, and a wine import company/brand. Noah spent three years living overseas building out Microsoft’s Server and Tools business in Eastern Europe working with the IT Pro and developer communities. He considers himself a futurist, likes science fiction and loves applying what was recently science fiction to real world problems and opportunities. 

5 Tips to Make Power BI Easy on the Brain

How you present your data driven insight is important! But unfortunately, analysts can sometimes forget to tell their story effectively, leaping from data exploration to a dashboard without giving much thought to how audiences will receive the information. Your insights can get lost in a messy report. If the information is critical, shouldn’t the communication medium be crisp, clean and understood at a glance?

Advanced Analytics tools, such as Qlik and Power BI, are fantastic for creating interactive dashboards and reports you can use to explore large datasets, understand trends, track key ratios and indicators, and then share insights with your colleagues, or your boss. What makes these tools useful? They take data and refine it into information by placing a visualization over it, thereby helping our visually oriented brains make sense of the numbers. When it comes to understanding the meaning behind the numbers, a data table or Excel report can leave a brain very, very tired.

Here are some quick tips for making your next analytics report “Easy on the brain”!

Our 5 Power BI Tips:

Respect the Rim

Before my career in technology began, I worked as a waiter, and I worked at some pretty classy spots. If you have never had the pleasure, let me share with you that before each plate makes it to its appointed destination, it is briefly inspected. If any sauces, herbs, or actual food has errantly landed on the rim of the plate, it is removed. “Respect the Rim,” my mentor once told me. The same is true for your data and information. Enforce a thin empty “margin” around each of your Power BI reports. By using the “Snap to Grid” feature, make sure that each visual on the report is aligned to your self-imposed margin. The analysis will look sharper and more credible.

What’s the Headline?

Most reports have data points which are essential, such as Key Performance Indicators (KPI) defined by management, or other indicators such as “Bottom Line” financials, Net Income or EBITDA. These essential measurements are the Headline for the report. Don’t bury the Headline – always place key information in the upper left-hand corner of the report, either in a Power BI Card or KPI visual.

Once you have done that, you can further segment visual information into key categories, and keep them segmented into groups. For example, beneath your KPI you may want to provide leading indicators or contributing factors. Another option may be to provide a group of categorical breakdowns together, or key ratios that contribute to the success or challenges of your headline. You may want to provide a group of visuals providing detailed exposition – a table or other visual with detailed categories. The information should flow from the Headline to the Exposition, just as a newspaper story would.

              

Have a Perspective

Reports that provide multiple ways to filter and slice the data are very helpful to data analysts, data scientists and casual explorers. These are tools to help you with data exploration. Once you’ve found insights worth sharing, focus the audience’s attention on that information by removing the extraneous bits. Don’t worry – the underlying Power BI data model remains for exploration of new insights later.

Make It Mobile

I always make a point of creating a phone layout for my reports, because it is very easy in Power BI. Due to the smaller form factor, phone layouts require you to further choose the essential information. However, if you’ve followed my advice, then you know what the headline is already. Simply drag the headlines onto the phone layout for your report before publishing. Among many outstanding features, the Power BI mobile app allows users to get notifications and data-driven alerts. End users can even mark up phone reports, distribute with their annotations and launch a conversation.

Intentional Style

Use good judgement and don’t get carried away with excessive colors, logos, or background images. I find that a company logo can be helpful for some audiences. However, when it comes to colors, be mindful of some universal rules.

  1. Some colors convey information, intended or otherwise (Red, Yellow and Green, for example)
  2. Company branding adds a professional touch – use the color scheme
  3. Use no more than 10 data colors, no more than 3 backgrounds and no more than 4 fonts

I recommend saving a Custom Theme for Power BI that reflects this guideline. Save off your company theme and save for later use. Any changes can be applied globally.

Your Most Important Information, Quickly Understood

Critical information is more valuable when it is quickly understood. Indeed, each visualization available conveys information in its own manner; therefore, it is important for professionals who prepare analysis with advanced analytics tools to be mindful of the strengths and weaknesses of each. Regardless of audience, these five guidelines apply.

Advanced analytics tools are a critical component to digital transformation, because they enable data-driven decision making. Among other things, data-driven decision making requires the creation of information from data. Often, that data is massive, or moving quite rapidly. To extract insights and reduce business uncertainty, talk to BlumShapiro about our analytics service offerings. We’ll provide a road map to data-driven decision making, enabling digital information at your fingertips. And you can focus on your business.

Berry_Brian-240About Brian: Brian Berry leads the Microsoft Business Intelligence and Data Analytics practice at BlumShapiro. He has over 15 years of experience with information technology (IT), software design and consulting. Brian specializes in identifying business intelligence (BI) and data management solutions for upper mid-market manufacturing, distribution and retail firms in New England. He focuses on technologies which drive value in analytics: data integration, self-service BI, cloud computing and predictive analytics

Microsoft Announces Power BI Premium: Removes Functionality on Free Version

Many of our clients come to us looking for solutions to help them achieve “Business Intelligence for Everyone” in their organization while avoiding the pitfalls of reporting in Excel. Our response is simple: Microsoft Power BI is an easy-to-use, non-technical business intelligence tool which is far more robust than Microsoft Excel for reporting. End users who rely upon Excel for reporting often view Power BI as a logical step up. With Power BI, users can automate mundane data transformation steps, connect to a broad range of data sources and securely collaborate with colleagues  —all within an environment that looks and feels just like Excel. Our clients have reported that Power BI’s free edition includes enough functionality to get started on any reporting initiative, automate data extraction and transformation activities and share the results with a team of executives, analysts, managers and colleagues. However, as Power BI data and report volumes grow, organizations may choose to step up to Power BI Pro, which upgrades users from 1GB to 10GB of data and enables complex analytics sharing capabilities, even outside the organization.

Finding a Solution for Larger Organizations

The current Power BI service does present some challenges to larger, more sophisticated organizations. Some of the issues include:

  •   Sharing and collaboration features would often become complex and difficult to manage
  • Compute resources are shared, not dedicated, and there is no ability to provision additional compute resources
  • Structured reporting capabilities are not well suited for interactive reports and “single pane of glass” dashboards delivered in Power Bi

These issues begged for a simpler, more manageable model for large organizations.

Introducing Power BI Premium

In early May 2017, Microsoft announced its intention to introduce a new licensing level for Power BI, Power BI Premium. Power BI Premium is designed to address the shortcomings of Power BI Pro. Here are three things to know about Power BI Premium:

  1. Power BI Premium Edition will support Power BI Apps. Power BI Apps replace Content Packs and Power BI Embedded. Organizations that currently share Power BI content externally with Power BI Embedded should plan to migrate to Power BI Premium Edition.
  1. Power BI Premium Edition offers dedicated capacity for organizations that need more control. Instead of paying strictly per user, Power BI Premium is licensed on a combined capacity and usage model. This enables organizations who struggle with the per user data limits enforced on Free and Pro Edition users (1 GB and 10GB maximums, respectively) to load data models that are much larger. As with other Azure services, organizations can scale up and scale down capacity as their needs change.
  1. Power BI Premium Edition includes a license for Power BI Report Server—a full featured on-premises solution supporting both Power BI (interactive) reports and Reporting Services (paginated, structured) reports.

Important Note for Power BI Free Edition Users

Power BI Free Edition became quite attractive because many users within the same organization could share content without paying any fee. Unfortunately, Power BI Free Edition functionality will be changing soon. Users on the Free Edition will no longer be able to share dashboards with colleagues, other than by printing them out, or showing others their “personal dashboard” in a browser. As of June 1, users enjoying dashboard sharing will no longer be able to do so under the Free Edition.

June 1st is right around the corner, and some organizations have built fully functional company dashboards using Free Edition licenses. These organizations now face the prospect of having to either upgrade to Power BI Pro Edition ($10/user/month) or lose vital collaboration features. This is why Microsoft is offering a 1-year trial of Power BI Pro licenses to users who have previously signed up for Power BI Free Edition. This allows organizations to carefully consider which users need Power BI Pro for data model, report and dashboard creation and collaboration and which do not. Some organizations will stay on the Free Edition, and simply share their BI content via PowerPoint. Others will look at Power BI Pro or Premium licensing and continue to see value.

Next Steps

Microsoft has stated that general availability of Power BI Premium is on the horizon, but no specific release date has been communicated. If your organization has many users creating reports and dashboards with the Free Edition, here are some things you can do to get ready for the change.

  1. Take advantage of the 1-Year Power BI Pro trial – encourage users to respond to any email communication from Microsoft and take advantage of the grace period
  1. Download the Power BI Report Server and take it for a spin
  1. Review the Power BI Premium Calculator to understand what your costs would look like under the Power BI Premium model

For more information on how to achieve high performance analytics and reporting with Power BI, contact Brian Berry and our Data Analytics team at bberry@blumshapiro.com, or by phone at 860.570.6368.

Berry_Brian-240About Brian: Brian Berry leads the Microsoft Business Intelligence and Data Analytics practice at BlumShapiro. He has over 15 years of experience with information technology (IT), software design and consulting. Brian specializes in identifying business intelligence (BI) and data management solutions for upper mid-market manufacturing, distribution and retail firms in New England. He focuses on technologies which drive value in analytics: data integration, self-service BI, cloud computing and predictive analytics