Our 5 Rules of Data Science

In manufacturing, the better the raw materials, the better the product. The same goes for data science, where a team cannot be effective unless the raw materials of data science are available to them. In this realm, data is the raw material which produces a prediction. However, raw materials alone are not sufficient. Business people who oversee machine learning teams must demand that best practices be applied, otherwise investments in machine learning will produce dubious business results. These best practices can be summarized into our five rules of data science.

For the purpose of illustration, let’s assume the data science problem our team is working on is related to the predictive maintenance of equipment on a manufacturing floor. Our team is working on helping the firm predict equipment failure, so that operations can replace the equipment before it impacts the manufacturing process.

Our 5 Rules of Data Science

1. Have a Sharp Question

A sharp question is specific and unambiguous. Computers do not appreciate nuance. They are not able to classify events into yes/no buckets if the question is: “Is Component X ready to fail?” Nor does the question need to concern itself with causes. Computers do not ask why – they calculate probability based upon correlation. “Will component X overheat?” is a question posed by a human who believes that heat contributes to equipment failure. A better question is: “Will component X fail in the next 30 minutes?”

2. Measure at the Right Level

Supervised learning requires real examples from which a computer can learn. The data you use to produce a successful machine learning model must demonstrate cases where failure has occurred. It must also demonstrate examples where equipment continues to operate smoothly. We must be able to unambiguously identify events that were failure events, otherwise, we will not be able to train the machine learning model to classify data correctly.

3. Make Sure Your Data is Accurate

Did a failure really occur? If not, the machine learning model will not produce accurate results. Computers are naïve – they believe what we tell them. Data science teams should be more skeptical, particularly when they believe they have made a breakthrough discovery after months of false starts. Data science leaders should avoid getting caught up in the irrational exuberance of a model that appears to provide new insight. Like any scientific endeavor, test your assumptions, beginning with the accuracy and reliability of the observations you started with to create the model.

4. Make Sure Your Data is Connected

The data used to train your model may be anonymized, because factors that correlate closely to machine failure are measurements, not identifiers. However, once the model is ready to be used, the new data must be connected to the real world – otherwise, you will not be able to take action. If you have no central authoritative record of “things”, you may need to develop a master data management solution before your Internet of Things with predictive maintenance machine learning can yield value. Also, your response to a prediction should be connected. Once a prediction of failure has been obtained, management should already know what needs to happen – use insights to take swift action.

5. Make Sure You Have Enough Data

The accuracy of predictions improve with more data. Make sure you have sufficient examples of both positive and negative outcomes, otherwise it will be difficult to be certain that you are truly gaining information from the exercise.

The benefits of predictive maintenance, and other applications of machine learning, are being embraced by businesses everywhere. For some, the process may appear a bit mysterious, but it needn’t be. The goal is to create a model which, when fed real-life data, improves the decision making of the humans involved in the process. To achieve this, data science teams need the right data and the right business problem to solve. Management should work to ensure that these five questions are answered to their satisfaction before investing in data science activities.

Not sure if you have the right raw materials? Talk to BlumShapiro Consulting about your machine learning ambitions. Our technology team is building next generation predictive analytics solutions that connect to the Internet of Things. We are helping our clients along each step of their digital transformation journey.

Berry_Brian-240About Brian: Brian Berry leads the Microsoft Business Intelligence and Data Analytics practice at BlumShapiro. He has over 15 years of experience with information technology (IT), software design and consulting. Brian specializes in identifying business intelligence (BI) and data management solutions for upper mid-market manufacturing, distribution and retail firms in New England. He focuses on technologies which drive value in analytics: data integration, self-service BI, cloud computing and predictive analytics

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