Applied Machine Learning: Optimizing Patient Care in Hospitals, Profitably

Why are so many industries exploring Machine Learning as a means of delivering innovation and value?  In my view, the technology speaks to a primitive urge – machine learning is like having a crystal ball, telling you what will happen next.  For a business, it can convey information about a customer before they introduce themselves.  On a personal level, when I consider what I would like to have information about in advance, the first thing that springs to mind is obvious: my health.  Am I about to get sick?  How can I improve my wellness and overall health?  If you are wearing a Fit-Bit right now, then you probably agree with me.

In my last blog, I shared some real-world examples for how the Hospitality Industry applies Machine Learning.  What about Health Care and Hospitals?  While hospitals have similar challenges, in that they accommodate guests who stay overnight, the objectives in health care are quite different, and changing rapidly.   The Affordable Care Act is driving new business models, incentivizing outcome based reimbursement as opposed to volume based reimbursement.  Unlike hotels, today’s hospitals are interested in ensuring their guests do not have to return, at least not in the short term.   They also need to manage costs in a way they have not been incentivized to do in the past.  Hospitals across the country are considering how predictive analytics can have a  meaningful impact on operations, leading to improved patient health and improving the bottom line.

The cost savings opportunity for health care providers is startling. Here are just three examples:

Reducing Hospital Readmissions – in 2014, Medicare fined 2,610 hospitals $428 million for having high hospital readmission rates. Leaving actual fines aside, industry analysts estimate that the overall cost of preventable readmissions approaches $25 Billion annually. As a result, hospital systems all over the nation are mobilizing to intervene, using ML to identify risk factors which are highly predictive of readmission. Carolinas Healthcare System, partnering with Microsoft, did just that. Using data from 200,000 patient-discharge records, they created a predictive model deliver customized discharge planning, saving the hospital system hundreds of thousands of dollars annually. Read the article in Healthcare IT News.

Clinical Variation Management – Mercy Hospital is partnering with Ayasdi to find the optimal care path for common surgical procedures. Using knee replacement as an example, the Clinical Variation Management software helps hospital administrators find clusters of patient outcomes, then enables the exploration of those clusters in order to correlate a metric (i.e. Length of Stay) with a certain regiment or activity. Watch this video to learn how Mercy Hospital saved $50 million by applying Machine Learning to an extremely common procedure.

Improving Population Health – Dartmouth Hitchcock, a healthcare network affiliated with Dartmouth University, is piloting a remote monitoring system for patients requiring chronic care. 6,000+ patients are permitting the hospital to collect biometric data (i.e. blood pressure, temperature, etc.) in order that nurses and health coaches can monitor their vital signs, and machines can predict good days and bad days. Quite the opposite of hospitality: Dartmouth Hitchcock is trying to keep the guests from needing to checking in! Read more about the Case Study from Microsoft.

Are machines taking over for physicians? No. The Patient – Physician relationship remains (and I think will always remain) central to the delivery of personal health care. However, it seems clear that ACA is providing significant rewards to health care providers who manage population risk better. Machines can help here: through data, machine learning can find risk “hiding in the data”.

Contact Blum Shapiro Consulting to learn more about how Azure Machine Learning can curtail hospital readmissions, identify variations in common clinical procedures and improve patient population health.

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