Archive for May 10, 2010

Day 10 – The Content Organizer

Actually doing a feature each work day has proven to be somewhat of a challenge. Depending on my schedule and the chaotic nature of the day at times the process of sitting down, composing some thoughts and publishing them can be difficult at best. I’ve thought about getting a few queued up and then posting at the appropriate time, but that flies in the face of my procrastinating nature. So, I guess will just have to deal with the occasional missed day. I’ll keep things in order, and will make sure we catch up at points, but I will not tolerate any complaints about no post on a given day J

Now, on to the meat of today’s feature – The Content Organizer. One of the greatest strengths of SharePoint is its ease of use and therefore it makes it easy for individuals to upload their content. This is also a source of weakness. It’s quite easy for a user to upload content that gets misclassified by the end user simply because they don’t understand the structure of the document system as intended. Enter “The Content Organizer”. The Content Organizer removes the burden of classification from the end user by routing content to the appropriate location based on meta data and content type. It builds on the routing capabilities that were present for Records Center applications and extends it to support additional scenarios.

 

The image above shows the different rules we have in our system based on Content Type.

 

This image shows the edit screen for a rule. You can see you have the ability to set property based conditions and then automatically create the target locations set of folders.

So, why is this useful? Well, there are several use cases. You could set up a rule to automatically have the size of a document library limited to 5000 documents so that when you hit 5001 a new folder is created and the documents routed there. You can have a site organized by departments or divisions and want to ensure that documents end up at the right level in the organization you can set up a rule that looks at some metadata to put it into the right document library. The payoff with this feature is that it will keep your document libraries cleaner and make it easier to find and work with content.

There’s a nice writeup on TechNet here: http://blogs.technet.com/speschka/archive/2009/10/30/sharepoint-2010-content-organizer-part-1-a-cool-new-feature-for-managing-your-content.aspx

and here: http://blogs.technet.com/speschka/archive/2009/10/30/sharepoint-2010-content-organizer-part-2-organizer-settings.aspx

As a partner with BlumShapiro Consulting, Michael Pelletier leads our Technology Consulting Practice. He consults with a range of businesses and industries on issues related to technology strategy and direction, enterprise and solution architecture, service oriented architecture and solution delivery.

Day 9 – Social Relevance

In previous versions of SharePoint a search result would appear based on certain factors – whether the keyword appear in the title, content, etc. of the document, whether the content was a document, a site or a list item. In other words, the results were governed simply by the content itself. Whether content is relevant, however, is something different entirely. SharePoint 2010 and FAST keep track of click-throughs based on search terms. The more that a user clicks through on an item through a search result the more it boosts its relevance in future searches.

In addition to impacting results via click-throughs, other features impact social relevance, like the star ratings, tags, I Like It, etc. This is really useful from a business standpoint because as more and more content is produced in an organization it becomes increasingly difficult to separate the wheat from the chaff. Social relevance essential allows your peers to work collectively to help you focus on the most relevant results by influencing their position and moving them to the top of the results list.

As a partner with BlumShapiro Consulting, Michael Pelletier leads our Technology Consulting Practice. He consults with a range of businesses and industries on issues related to technology strategy and direction, enterprise and solution architecture, service oriented architecture and solution delivery.

Day 8 – Did You Mean

Knowing how to spell and actually hitting the right keys on a keyboard when typing something in are two different things. Microsoft has introduced a feature into SharePoint 2010 and FAST called “Did You Mean”. Now, when you enter in a search term if it doesn’t find any results for that term it will determine if there is a phonetically similar word and present that as a suggested alternative.

 

This is clearly useful in a business scenario where finding information is critical. Aside from my silly mistyping example, you may not know exactly how to spell the name of a customer or product or otherwise. With the “Did You Mean” feature it helps you avoid the improper assumption that there aren’t any documents for a given customer simply because they didn’t show up in a search result.

As a partner with BlumShapiro Consulting, Michael Pelletier leads our Technology Consulting Practice. He consults with a range of businesses and industries on issues related to technology strategy and direction, enterprise and solution architecture, service oriented architecture and solution delivery.

Day 7 – Mobile Connectivity

More and more data is access on the go. As SharePoint serves as the single point of consumption for more and more of that data it only stands to reason that it would be great to get that data on the go on your mobile device.

So, just how much of a useable experience is there? Well, you can do the following:

  • Use the Excel mobile viewer to look at a spreadsheet
  • Carry out a people search
  • Access picture libraries for both viewing and uploading
  • Navigate document libraries and lists

The list goes on and the value is self-explanatory. What are the supported devices you ask?

  • IE Mobile on Windows Mobile 5/6/6.1/6.5
  • Safari4 on iPhone 3G/S
  • BlackBerry 4.x and newer versions
  • Nokia S60
  • NetFront 3.4, 3.5 and newer versions
  • Opera Mobile 8.65 and newer versions
  • Openwave 6.2, 7.0 and newer versions

That covers just about any decent smartphone device out there.

 

In addition to browser based support, Microsoft has also release SharePoint Workspace client for Windows mobile for a more robust experience navigating lists and libraries.

Finally, for those of you with a thirst for the technical, you can check out this link on Technet for detailed information on how to get your SharePoint 2010 Server configured to support mobile devices:

http://blogs.technet.com/office2010/archive/2010/03/09/configure-sharepoint-server-2010-for-mobile-device-access.aspx

As a partner with BlumShapiro Consulting, Michael Pelletier leads our Technology Consulting Practice. He consults with a range of businesses and industries on issues related to technology strategy and direction, enterprise and solution architecture, service oriented architecture and solution delivery.