CC’d By Mistake: Helpful Outlook Tip Series – Ignore Feature

Have you been CC’d before on emails that you should not have been copied on in the first place? The old way of handling these emails was to simply delete them as they came in. However, in larger email chains there may be numerous email replies and time spent deleting these can quickly add up, resulting in lost productivity. A faster and easier way to reduce these emails is to highlight the message in your Outlook inbox and then click the Ignore button in the ribbon under the home tab.

CC'd by Mistake 1

If it’s your first time using this feature, you will see this additional prompt below, just click on Ignore Conversation button to delete the email conversation.

Now, if there are any future replies to that email thread, Outlook will automatically send it to your Deleted Items folder. If you accidentally ignored the email conversation, right click on the email in your Deleted Items and click on the Ignore button again to restore the email conversation back to your inbox.

This is one more tip for how to utilize the features of Office 365 to be more efficient and productive with your time. If you aren’t already using Outlook, we recommend trying Office 365 which gives you access to the latest Office version (Office 2016). Learn more about how BlumShapiro Consulting can help implement Office 365 for your organization to use.

david haleAbout David: As a senior consultant with BlumShapiro Consulting, David coaches a range of businesses on the latest Microsoft cloud solutions. David’s belief is in keeping technology simple and easy to use for businesses. David has experience in the lifecycle of technology implementations from assessments, selections, implementations and project management. David specializes in the SMB/non-profit market for Microsoft Office 365 and Dynamics CRMDavid received a Bachelor of Science in Information Systems Management from Quinnipiac University. Prior to joining BlumShapiro in 2009, David was a Desktop Support Specialist at Aetna in Middletown, CT. He currently holds a Microsoft Certified Professional (MCP) in Office 365, Dynamics CRM and is a Yammer Certified Community Manager.

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Intelligent Apps Are Friendly Apps

multitasking in hands

Whether you are a human or a computer, it pays to be friendly. When you buy something, are you more likely to buy from friendly or unfriendly salespeople? I like to spend time with people, but only if they are friendly. I am more apt to be generous with people who are friendly and am more easily persuaded by friendly people.

With technology, I love to interact with friendly software, or should I say “intelligent apps”. What makes for an intelligent app? Well, they are apps which exhibit a kind of machine intelligence which we associate with human intelligence. Not “super computers,” but computers and software which exhibit the same qualities I enjoy in friendly people. Let me get a little more specific:

  • People whom I have met before usually recognize the sound of my voice. Those who listen to what I say are ones which I admit to my inner circle. My friends may disagree with what I say, but I know that they listen and understand me.
  • People whom I have just met make some guesses about my mood and interact with me accordingly. My friends recognize my mood pretty quickly when they converse with me. My close friends always seem to respond to me in ways that are intended to bring me back to a positive frame of mind.
  • Most humans I come across recognize that, when I get to the “heart of the matter,” I am not performing surgery, or dealing with organs in any way. Only a literal minded person, or a super-computer, would come to that conclusion.
  • Finally, I often come across humans who do a great job of sharing knowledge with me. When I ask questions, they provide me with a lot of great information. I enjoy spending time with people who are knowledgeable, yet humble, and try to maintain contact with them professionally.

Of course, computers and software have historically not done any of these things well! It’s no wonder many people may find them infuriating. Our computers and software just haven’t conformed to our perceptions of intelligence – therefore, we don’t perceive them as friendly. But, longstanding ideas about what artificial intelligence (AI) looks like have inspired what are called “Cloud-Based Cognitive Services.” In other words, scientists and engineers have figured out that cloud computing, big data and data sciences have enabled the technologies needed to deliver AI.

Meet Your New Best Friends

I think the thing which is so attractive about “intelligent apps” is that I perceive them as being friendly.  Take Windows Hello, the facial recognition software in Windows 10 which recognizes your face as your login. I much prefer logging onto my Surface Pro 4 at home (which has Windows Hello) than my work laptop (which does not). My face never expires, does not need to be reset, and doesn’t need to be remembered! This is just a fabulous experience; it’s almost as though my tablet “knows me.”

Here is another example of intelligence which makes life easier- natural language processing in Power BI. Before natural language processing, I had to apply filters to my data, click around to find the thing I was looking for and format the graphs and charts on my report. With Power BI, I can simply type “Show Me Last Year’s Sales by Territory” and the data appears. This is simply one example. Power BI dashboard authors do not even have to have created a report in order for this intelligent app to suggest it as a possible solution. When paired with the voice recognition capabilities of Cortana, it may seem that you have a digital assistant with limitless access to the dashboard, reports and data you need to run your business.

Cloud-Based Cognitive Services

Today’s modern applications are intelligent apps, and the hallmark of an intelligent app is human-like artificial intelligence. Most application developers do not have access to the AI algorithms needed to be truly effective. However, the giants of cloud computing have made these capabilities easy to acquire and integrate into your next product, service or business systems.

Microsoft Cognitive Services are a set of API’s (need to spell this out first) which application developers can embed into their modern apps to make them intelligent. There are API’s for visual recognition, speech recognition, text analytics, recommendations and much more. Perhaps you want to create an app which recognizes a face, or a user’s voice. Perhaps you want to create an app which interacts with users differently based upon the user’s perceived mood. Perhaps you want to make recommendations to customers on your website. It’s all possible, and in fact, a lot easier than you might imagine.

BlumShapiro Consulting is a Microsoft Advanced Analytics partner, with expertise in building modern intelligent apps. And we are extremely friendly.

Berry_Brian-240About Brian: Brian Berry leads the Microsoft Business Intelligence and Data Analytics practice at BlumShapiro. He has over 15 years of experience with information technology (IT), software design and consulting. Brian specializes in identifying business intelligence (BI) and data management solutions for upper mid-market manufacturing, distribution and retail firms in New England. He focuses on technologies which drive value in analytics: data integration, self-service BI, cloud computing and predictive analytics. 

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On the Leading Edge of New Technology

Finger about to press future button with blue light over black and grey background. Concept image for illustration of change or strategic vision.

Being on the leading edge of any technology can be exciting, but it’s often frustrating and even costly. There is an inherent risk associated with adopting technology that is new. Lack of community support or documentation if something goes wrong are just a couple of the issues that can arise. However, there are benefits to being an early adopter. For example, working hands-on with a new technology is the best way to understand how it works. As technology consultants, we view it as our job to understand what’s coming so we can advise our clients with a clear eye to the future.


A client asked us about alternatives to their current Remote Desktop Services (RDS) implementation which was being hosted by a third-party vendor. There were a few issues with their current setup, namely cost and maintaining multiple logins, and they didn’t have any type of domain or user directory. After exploring a few different RDS deployment scenarios, they ultimately decided on using a preview version of Azure Active Directory Domain Services (AD DS) on Azure virtual machines.

They really liked the idea of using Azure AD DS because of the promised benefits; no servers (on-premises or in the cloud) to maintain, simplified user interface, etc. We shared our assessment of the risks and unknowns of using an untested technology, but the client whole heartedly accepted these risks because there were so many more upsides to using Azure AD DS for their specific setup. So, we set out to implement Remote Desktop Services using Azure Active Directory Domain Services…and we learned a couple of things along the way which we are happy to share with you.

Sometimes the Leading Edge is the Bleeding Edge

The first lesson learned was that with Azure AD DS, you cannot be added as a Domain Admin or Global Admin. They have their own security group called AAD DC Administrators that you have to create yourself. A good thing to note when dealing with Azure AD DS. Which lead us right to our second lesson learned.

When trying to add the Licensing Manager as a member of the AD group Terminal Server License Servers group, a permissions error popped up:

The computer account for license server [ServerName] cannot be added to the Terminal Server License Servers group in Active Directory Domain Services (AD DS) because of insufficient privileges.

Leading Edge

Thinking back to that security group, I thought, “I am not a Domain Admin, I cannot be a Domain Admin.” I felt a little helpless. Thankfully the computer didn’t need to be added to the group since all RDS servers were on the same domain. But still, I couldn’t help feeling like something might be a miss later.

As a Microsoft partner we have top tier access to Microsoft support, who recommended a few solutions to this issue…which resulted in the same permissions’ roadblock.

When the Microsoft support engineer mentioned this was the first he has heard of someone trying this, I thought, I must be a pioneer attempting this while AD DS was still in beta. But one thing was for sure, the Azure AD DS team liked the idea that someone was trying out an RDS implementation with it.

When you work with a beta version or when you install something without waiting for Service Pack 2 to be released you are blazing a new trail. When you do something new there is a thrill of being the first person to try something, and a long-standing honor in the tech world to be the first to figure something out.

In the end, after another hiccup or two, the rest of the Remote Desktop Services deployment went well, without any additional permission issues. And the result showed us that Remote Desktop Services does work well with Azure Active Directory Domain Services and was able to accomplish the client’s goals.

Once the beta for Azure Active Directory Domain Services is complete, I’m wondering if RDS will be on the list of supported technologies. Then I will feel like a true trailblazer cutting a path for others to follow.

Our experience with Microsoft tools gives us an inside track and an ability to work with these new technologies because we deeply understand the underlying platform. While being on the bleeding edge of technology can be risky, having experts to help guide you, navigate any issues and provide needed support can help mitigate some of these risks. And in the end, the benefits to your organization will outweigh any roadblocks encountered along the way.

About Brent:


Brent Harvey has over 10 years of software development experience with a specific focus on SharePoint, Project Server, and C #and web development. Brent is an Architect at BlumShapiro Consulting, working on projects across varied industries (banking, manufacturing, health care, etc.). Brent is a Microsoft Certified Solutions Expert in SharePoint 2013, Solutions Associate in Windows Server 2012, Specialist in Developing Azure Solutions, and Professional Developer in SharePoint 2010.

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Electrify Your Business with Data

Data is a lot like electricity – a little bit at a time, not too much direct contact, and you’re fine. For example, a single nine-volt battery doesn’t provide enough power to light a single residential bulb. In fact, it would take about a dozen nine-volt batteries to light that single bulb, and it would only last about an hour. It’s only when you get massive amounts of electricity flowing in a controlled way that you can see real results, like running electric motors, lighting up highway billboards, heating an oven or powering commuter trains.

iStock_000006412772XSmallIt’s the same with data. The sale of a single blue shirt at a single outlet store is not much data. And it’s still not much even when you combine it with all the sales for that store in a single day. But what about a year’s worth of data, from multiple locations? Massive amounts of data can do amazing things for us as well. We have all seen in today’s data centric business environment what controlled usage of data can do.

Some examples include:

  • The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) can now more accurately predict a hurricane’s path thanks to data that has been collected over time
  • Marketing firms can save money on culled down distribution lists based on customer demographics, shopping habits and preferences.
  • Medical experts can identify and treat conditions and diseases much better based on a patient’s history, life risks and other factors.
  • Big ‘multi-plex’ movie houses can predict more accurately the number of theatres it will need to provision for the latest summer block buster by analyzing Twitter and other social media feeds as related to the movie.

All of this can be done thanks to controlled data analytics.

The key word here is “controlled.” With a background in marine engineering and shore-side power generation, I have seen my share of what can happen when electricity and other sources of energy are not kept ‘controlled.’ Ever see what happens when a handful of welding rods go through a steam turbine spinning at 36,000 RPM and designed for tolerances of thousandths of an inch? It’s not pretty. After as many years in database technologies, data analysis and visualizations, I have also seen the damage resulting from large quantities of uncontrolled data. In his book Signal: Discerning What Matters Most in a World of Noise, author Steven Few shows a somewhat tongue-in-cheek graph that ‘proves’ that the sale of ice cream is a direct cause of violent crime. Or was it the other way around?  It’s an obvious comic hyperbole that serves to illustrate his point that we need to be careful of how we analyze and correlate data.

With the ‘big data’ explosion, proponents will tell you that ‘if a little is good, then more is better.’ It’s an obvious extension, but is it accurate? Is there such a thing as ‘too much data’?

Let’s say you are a clothing retail store in the mall. Having data for all of your sales over the past ten years, broken down by item, store, date, salesperson and any number of other dimensions may be essential. What if we were to also include ALL the sales of ALL competitors’ products, seasonal weather history, demographic changes, foot traffic patterns in the mall and just about anything else that could influence a customer’s decision to buy your product even down to what they had for lunch just before they made the purchase? The result would most likely be UN-controlled data analysis. This tends to lead to erroneous correlations and bad decisions. For instance, you just might discover that customers are four times as likely to make a purchase if they had pizza for lunch, never realizing that there are more pizza restaurants near your stores than any other type of food service!

When it comes to data, stick with what you know is good data. Make sure it’s clean, reliable and most of all, relevant. Most of all, make sure you CONTROL your data. Without control, there may be no stopping the damage that results.

About Todd: Todd Chittenden started his programming and reporting career with industrial maintenance applications in the late 1990’s. When SQL Server 2005 was introduced, he quickly became certified in Microsoft’s latest RDBMS technology and has added certifications over the years. He currently holds an MCSE in Business Intelligence. He has applied his knowledge of relational databases, data warehouses, business intelligence and analytics to a variety of projects for BlumShapiro since 2011.

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